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High-Salt Diets Increase Osteoporosis Risk

  By posted Jul 27th 2012
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High-Salt Diets Up Osteoporosis Risk

*Image courtesy: © Thinkstock photos/ Getty Images

*Text Courtesy ANI

Medical researchers at the University of Alberta may have solved why people who eat high-salt diets are prone to developing medical problems such as kidney stones and osteoporosis, the puzzle that has remained unknown to scientific community until now.

Principal investigator Todd Alexander and his team recently discovered an important link between sodium and calcium thorough their work with animal lab models and cells.

These both appear to be regulated by the same molecule in the body. When sodium intake becomes too high, the body gets rid of sodium via the urine, taking calcium with it, which depletes calcium stores in the body.

High levels of calcium in the urine lead to the development of kidney stones, while inadequate levels of calcium in the body lead to thin bones and osteoporosis.

"When the body tries to get rid of sodium via the urine, our findings suggest the body also gets rid of calcium at the same time," said Alexander, a Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry researcher.

"This is significant because we are eating more and more sodium in our diets, which means our bodies are getting rid of more and more calcium. Our findings reinforce why it is important to have a low-sodium diet and why it is important to have lower sodium levels in processed foods," he noted.

It's been known for a long time that this important molecule was responsible for sodium absorption in the body, but the discovery that it also plays a role in regulating calcium levels is new.

"We asked a simple question with our research - could sodium and calcium absorption be linked? And we discovered they are," said Alexander.

"We found a molecule that seems to have two jobs - regulating the levels of both calcium and sodium in the body. Our findings provide very real biological evidence that this relationship between sodium and calcium is real and linked," he added.

In their research, the team worked with lab models that didn't have this important molecule, so the models' urine contained high levels of calcium. Because calcium was not absorbed and retained by the body, bones became thin.

Experts pointed out that this molecule could be a drug target to one day "treat kidney stones and osteoporosis."

Their findings were recently published in the peer-reviewed journal American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology.

 

 

 

 

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